Bichon Frise clothing, strollers, jewelry, and articles
CONTACT US VIEW CART SHOPPING DETAILS
Links
  HOME
  ABOUT US
  DOGGIE TEES
  SIZE CHART
  PEOPLE TEES
  STROLLERS
  PENDANTS/KEYCHAINS
  CONTACT US
  SHOPPING DETAILS
  FREE ARTICLES
  BICHON FRISE VIDEOS
  VIEW CART
  SPECIAL BICHON SALUTE
 
 

 

 

 

Free Bichon Frise Articles

 

Bichon Frise: Are Bichon Frises Really Hypoallergenic?

Hy-po-al-ler-gen-ic (from Greek prefix hypo meaning "below normal" or "slightly")
: Having little likelihood of causing an allergic response<hypoallergenic cosmetics><hypoallergenic dogs>
Definition from Miriam-Webster Online Dictionary


Since Bichon Frises have often been promoted as being hypoallergenic, what does this really mean?

Even though ďhypoallergenicĒ is an adjective commonly used to describe products that are unlikely to cause an allergic reaction, it is not a medical term therefore not subject to a certain standard for use. The term hypoallergenic originated with advertisers to describe textiles and cosmetics that claimed to cause fewer allergic reactions. As the prefix hypo implies it means ďlessĒ not ďnoneĒ.

Although the Bichon Frise can be an excellent choice for those who have allergies, because they donít shed, no dog is known to be completely not allergenic.

People tend to think that they are allergic to dog or cat hair. When actually allergic reactions are not caused by pet hair but by allergens found in proteins in the skin and shed as dander allergens. Dander allergens are the dead skin cells that are not only found in your petís hair but also in saliva, urine and can be transferred to your petís fur when they clean or lick themselves. Allergens can be very stubborn; they cling to clothes and furniture and can remain airborne for long periods of time.

Often an allergy can go undetected for some time since it takes multiple exposures to dander allergens to trigger an allergic reaction. If you think you might be allergic to your dog and of course you donít want to get rid of your family pet, itís important to learn how to manage your allergies.

So what can you do if you start getting red itchy eyes, runny nose and sneezing and wheezing and you suspect your faithful companion causes it? First check with your physician to see if you really are allergic to your little Bichon Frise, or if youíre allergic to something else, such as mold, dust or pollen. If you suspect or discover that your precious pet may be the culprit you can improve your environment by making the following changes.

To Allergen Proof Your Home:

  • Use air cleaners and air filters.
  • Increase surfaces that can be washed easily.
  • Install vertical blinds instead of curtains.
  • Steam-clean wall-to-wall carpeting or remove carpets.
  • Vacuum frequently using a vacuum cleaner with a high allergen containment rating.


  • Restrict your petís access to regularly used furniture and bedroom.
  • Wash pets weekly with a special moisturizing allergy shampoo.
  • Spray petís coat with an anti-allergy spray to help minimize allergies.
  • Wash hands often when playing or grooming pet.
  • Groom often to keep skin and coat healthy.
  • Groom outside.
  • Wear gloves and mask while grooming.

Bichon Frises are often recommended to individuals with allergies because they typically produce fewer allergens and donít shed. Since individual allergy sufferers vary greatly, a hypoallergenic pet may still affect someone with severe allergies or asthma. If youíre an allergy sufferer and considering adopting a Bichon Frise you might want to visit him/her a few times before bringing your pet home.

Back to Bichon Frise articles

   © COPYRIGHT 2007 - 2012 Kay Hubin & Antion & Associates All Rights Reserved